Postgraduate Certificate International Relations

Queen Mary University of London - Offered by CEG Digital, United Kingdom

postgraduate-certificate-international-relations

Next enrollment cycle

May 2022

See all cycles

Total Course Fee

USD 5,991

Course Accredited By

ACCA

  • 1 Years
  • Online
  • Postgraduate
  • Certificate

This programme can be studied part-time as MA, Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) or Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert). The PGDip and PGCert are shorter taught versions of the masters programme. They don’t require a dissertation but provide you with masters-level content. 

This programme can be studied part-time as MA, Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) or Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert). The PGDip and PGCert are shorter taught versions of the masters programme. They don’t require a dissertation but provide you with masters-level content. 

Why study International Relations?
What are the main characteristics of the international order?
How has globalisation changed international relations?
To what extent is the international order based on conflict or cooperation?
How is the global financial crisis affecting international politics?
Do foreign military interventions in civil wars help or hinder peace-making?
Why are economic resources so unevenly spread across the world, and what are the prospects for global justice?

If you are interested in these questions and are excited at the prospect of exploring them with like-minded individuals, but your circumstances or commitments make it difficult for you to attend university, then our online International Relations MA is for you.  The programme offers challenging and thought-provoking modules to help you formulate your answers, and a lively, intelligent group of students and academics with which to debate and exchange ideas.

What to expect

Want to know more? Here’s a brief summary of what you can expect if you decide to study with Queen Mary Online:

  • Modules taught by academics at the cutting-edge of their fields, involved in contributing to the international understanding of the subject
  • Opportunities to develop the skills and knowledge to think, talk and write critically about contemporary international challenges
  • Firm foundation for further study
  • Focus on traditional and current challenges in international relations in conjunction with emerging areas of interest in the developing world
  • Discussions on the historical significance of globalisation and how it relates to a number of key issues in international relations.
  • The diversity of our staff and students makes Queen Mary a great place to study international relations.

Enrollment Cycles

  • May 2022
  • September 2022

To be eligible for the International Relations programme, you should have: 

  • A minimum of an upper second-class honours degree in politics or a related discipline.*
    * We may consider graduates with a minimum of an upper second class-honours degree in another subject with either additional relevant qualifications or work experience.

If your first language is not English, you should also have one of the following:

  • IELTS Academic: 7.0 overall including 6.5 in Writing, and 5.5 in Reading, Listening and Speaking. 
  • TOEFL: 100 overall including 24 in Writing, 18 in Reading, 17 in Listening and 20 in Speaking.
  • PTE Academic: 68 overall including 62 in Writing, and 51 in Reading, Listening and Speaking.
  • Taking your English language requirement test at home

For the May 2021 start date only, the following at-home tests are also being accepted:

  • HOME TOEFL: 100 overall including 24 in Writing, 18 in Reading, 17 in Listening and 20 in Speaking.
  • IELTS Indicator Test: 7.0 overall including 6.5 in Writing, and 5.5 in Reading, Listening and Speaking

The PGCert in International Relations is available for part time study over two semesters (one academic year). During that time, you will undertake two compulsory modules. For each module, you will be awarded 30 credits each. In order to receive your PGCert you must have accrued 60 credits, which involves completing every aspect of the modules and passing all relevant assignments.

1) Contemporary World Politics: Theories, Concepts, Themes This module is designed to provide you with a command of key concepts and theoretical traditions in international relations and an understanding of their relevance to contemporary themes in world politics.

We will evaluate political developments and statements and analyse critical themes in world politics. Through a close reading of advanced theoretical texts, you will expand your conceptual and theoretical knowledge and begin to think critically about competing interpretations of events, and longer term developments in international relations.

Online discussions will encourage you to compare and critically evaluate theoretical knowledge and to express your arguments effectively.

2) International Security: War and Peace in a Global Context Violent conflict and the use of force remain salient issues in contemporary international relations. While some have theorised that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make the use of force and violent conflict less relevant to the world, war and conflict have remained an integral part of the international system, forming an obstacle to providing stability and security for many states.

In this module, we will examine how force is used by states and other actors, and how it is managed in world politics. Together, we will survey a variety of perspectives on the causes of war and peace in order to better examine the roots of violent conflicts and security problems in the present day. A major theme of the module looks at war in a global context, not only in terms of integrating contemporary concerns with globalisation, but also by looking at interconnections between north and south, and war and society. We will also explore the responses of the international community to violent conflict, looking broadly at the contested notion of ‘Just War’, international law, and the role of the United Nations.

Overall, the module will provide you with a broad perspective on the place of armed force in contemporary international relations.

3) Themes and Cases in US Foreign Policy In this module, we will consider the principal forms in which US foreign policy has been practised and interpreted since the foundation of the Republic. Amongst these are American Exceptionalism and Anti-Americanism, ‘spheres of influence’, liberal interventionism and protectionist isolationism, Cold War containment, the ‘War on Terror’ following 9/11, and the strains on uni-polarity in the early 21st century.

Case studies linked to these themes will allow us to consider the role of Native Americans and immigration, the war of 1898, gunboat diplomacy in the Caribbean, the ideas of Woodrow Wilson, the Vietnam War, the consequences of the 9/11 attacks, and the challenges posed by China.

4) Globalisation and the International Political Economy of Development This module provides you with a detailed examination and critique of theories of globalisation, an assessment of contemporary globalising processes, and how these particularly influence the developing world.

We will examine the analysis of contemporary manifestations of ‘globalisation’, including neo-liberalism, US hegemony and contemporary imperialism, capital flows, global commodity chains, state-market relations, patterns of global inequality, international institutions, and questions of cultural homogenisation/imperialism. The module also looks at the ways in which ‘globalisation’ is resisted, focusing on the rise of transnational social movements and NGOs, and the politics of ‘anti-globalisation’, and how this relates to an ostensibly ‘post-development’ era.

In addressing these issues, the module concludes by asking the most important question: how do we think of ‘development’ in an era of ‘globalisation’, US hegemony, neo-liberalism and imperialism?

Interested in this course?

Our Admissions Counsellors would love to assist!